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“life-changing career” – What it Means For Me

Category: International Operations Business | (0) comments

 

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June has finally arrived and in 3 months, the graduate programme for the 2015 batch will be wrapping up. In football terms, we’re in the last 15 minutes of the game with everything there is to win. Indeed, the programme has been true to its tag-line: “life-changing career”. I have learned so much about Novo Nordisk and its business but most importantly, I have learned a lot about myself. I have experienced and done things that never in my wildest dreams could’ve imagined. I have learned from most the ambitious, amazing, and inspiring people throughout the programme spanning 3 different continents.

When I was doing my master’s degree, I wanted to do something that would change the world and have a positive impact on people. (Yeah, that typical millennial mindset trying to conceal the fact that I didn’t know what to do with my life). However, I really didn’t know exactly what it was I wanted to change but I did want to make a difference somewhere, somehow. Fair enough, I had ideas yet they remained ideas with no actual plans of realizing them. Or, I was too idealistic that the changes or impact that I wanted in this world were just not feasible. It was frustrating, and most importantly, getting expensive as I was living in Boston after graduation with dwindling funds and no actual income. Everything changed when I got into the graduate programme.

For my first rotation, I went back to the Philippines. As it was my first time in the pharmaceutical industry, I had some catching up to do. The first few months were certainly an information overload. I learned more about diabetes and how the disease affects people, along with terminology such as pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and different kinds of proteins (I have a business background and in no way would I have encountered those words before).  As for my main project there, I was assigned to do a medical education event that would benefit HCPs and patients. It was exciting and I felt really great as I was finally doing something impactful. However, being a newbie in the industry, it definitely had its challenges as I had to deal with internal and external stakeholders who were far more experienced and definitely demanding. Yet, as a graduate, I got a bit of leniency and understanding from all of them.  After all, it was the beginning of a learning process. My key takeaways from that first rotation was to learn and absorb as quickly as possible, don’t be afraid to make mistakes, and don’t think that you are the messiah sent from the heavens that can immediately turn things around. (But it would also be great if you can!)

As for my second rotation, I worked in the global headquarters in Denmark. As Rihanna would sing, “shine bright like a diamond, shine bright like a diamond,” which was also my approach and it was definitely a rotation where I can have a global impact; just like how I wished it to be. As my pharmaceutical experience was limited to the Philippine affiliate operations, I imagined myself as a diamond in the rough. This was certainly an opportunity to learn about global operations and be involved in projects with a global reach. In Denmark, they were more familiar with handling graduates and the expectations were more clear and actionable. In my role, it was certainly fulfilling as the projects involved more countries and with that, came a bigger impact. Being assigned there in global headquarters provided me with the opportunity to reach out and learn from global managers with different functions and from different countries. I was able to interact with various kinds of people coming from different backgrounds who have given me a wider perspective of the business and, cheesy as it may sound, life. My key takeaways from that experience was that it has set some things into perspective and most importantly, it gave me a perfect example on what work-life balance is, in addition to a concrete example of what should be prioritized in life.

Finally, for my 3rd rotation, I got assigned to Colombia. I have been living here for the last 5 months and my role has also changed to a new therapy area, which means a new set of patients and a new set of products. Compared to my 1st and 2nd rotations, I came here with a lot of confidence as I was more familiar with the operations and where to get the available resources. I feel so at home here because it’s like Philippines except that people speak in Spanish. The hospitality of the people has been amazing, not just my co-workers but people in general. Everyone has been so helpful and warm, and frankly, I couldn’t ask for more. In terms of personal goals, I have finally figured out what exactly I want to do after having learned about haemophilia and how it affects the lives of people who have the condition. Being a new parent myself, I can relate to how challenging it is to take care of a child and can imagine how much more so for the parents of children with haemophilia and of course, the patient himself. It’s a rare disease affecting approximately 1 in every 5,000 males born worldwide. It’s a disease where access to adequate care is very challenging in the developing world. Given these conditions, it’s a specific opportunity where changes can be done.

I still have 3 more months in this beautiful country but I think I already know what my key takeaway is and it has to be a combination of these; be ambitious, stay focused, be patient, say “no” at times and trust the process. Over the last 21 months, the graduate programme for me has not only been a professional growth process, but it’s also a personal development process where I learned to figure out what I can do with my life and how I can contribute to this world.

 

 

What is haemophilia? Click here to learn more.

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Q&A about the GRC (Graduate Recruitment Centre)

Category: Business Processes European Finance Global & European Market Access Global Finance Global Marketing R&D Global Development R&D Regulatory Affairs | (0) comments

If you are reading this graduate blog post, you were likely invited for the Graduate Recruitment Centre (GRC) in Copenhagen next week – so first of all congratulations! You are in for a fun and intense day filled with group exercises, presentations and networking. This blog post is based on three questions I have received from a candidate participating at the GRC next week, so I hope the rest of you can use these answers as well.

 

1. How do I prepare my personal compass?

The personal compass is your opportunity to demonstrate to the assessors who you are as a person deep down. Use the presentation of your personal compass to tell the assessors your story and include personal elements you wouldn’t normally put in a CV or application. The aim for this exercise is to get to know you better and learn more about what drives and motivates you. A good advice is to prepare examples from your past experiences that demonstrate how you behave in specific situations. This is also highly relevant in the interviews many of you will have on Monday.

 

2. How do I make the best impression during the GRC?

It might sound a little lame, but you give the best impression by being yourself! You were chosen for a reason and you were chosen among a lot of talented people, so keep in mind that Novo Nordisk finds YOU interesting. To give the best possible impression, think about why you are interested in the pharmaceutical industry, Novo Nordisk as a company, and the graduate programme you applied for. A big and important part of the GRC is the group exercises where you engage in problem-solving tasks. Here you will be assessed on what role you take in the group, how you contribute to the group dynamics and how good a team-player you are. Don’t hesitate to take initiative, but do it in humble way where you make room for the other group members as well.

 

3. What was your personal impression of GRC last year? How did you like it? Was it stressful? Were there any social activities etc.?

My impression of the GRC last year was really good! I didn’t quite know what to expect, but was positively surprised by how great and fun the experience was. The schedule was definitely tight (even though we had two days), but I didn’t find it stressful. You will have breaks during the day where there is time to mingle and get to know the other candidates. In regards to social activities there is a dinner at night (which I assume you already know), where you are not assessed and can enjoy the nice atmosphere and food together with some of us current graduates and the assessors.

 

GRC

A picture from the GRC 2016

Let me know if you have comments or more questions and read Mathilde’s GRC tips right here.

I wish you the best of luck – don’t forget that you deserve to be there, so give everything you have, this is the only chance! I can recommend to watch some motivational TedTalks if you need a little extra energy.

I look forward to see you all the GRC!

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Before 30 Years Old

Category: International Operations Business | (0) comments

“Before 30 years old, follow somebody. Go to a small company. Normally, in a big company, it is good to learn processing; you are part of a big machine. But when you go to a small company, you learn the passion, you learn the dreams. You learn how to do a lot of things at one time. So before 30 years old, it’s not which company you go to, it’s which boss you follow. That’s very important. A good boss teaches you differently.” – Jack Ma

Just in case you don’t know him, he’s the founder of Alibaba Group and one of the most successful businessmen in the world. When I was doing my masters, I had tons of time to watch his interviews and the quote above is probably one of my favorites.

So you might ask, if he said to go to “a small company”, why am I working for Novo Nordisk, one of the biggest pharmaceutical companies in the world? Well, I asked myself that too almost 2 years ago!!!

Fast forward to today, I am on my final rotation in my 3rd country and I can answer the question already. Why am I working for Novo Nordisk and why I would recommend the IO Business Graduate Programme.

  1. “Go to a small company” – One of the best things of the IO Business Graduate programme which I only realized now is that you start in the affiliate. When I started, I felt sort of disappointed and bad that I needed to go back to the Philippines after doing my masters in 1st world countries. After enjoying the convenience and safety of 1st world countries, I had to go back to a 3rd world country once again. But you know what, once I figured out that the affiliate was actually growing in double digits, I felt relieved. It got me excited! Yes, Novo Nordisk is a big company globally indeed but in the affiliate level, it is still rapidly growing and it has a lot of challenges ahead. I knew then that the opportunities for learning would be great and in this stage of my career, that’s the perfect breeding ground. It is like joining a small company after all!
  2. You learn the passion, you learn the dreams. You learn how to do a lot of things at one time.” – As a graduate in the affiliate, you learn how to do a lot of things at one time. You may be assigned to a Marketing project but you also get to do some tasks related to Commercial effectiveness, Finance, Product supply, Medical Affairs, and sometimes, even changing the printer’s ink! It may sound absurd but that’s actually very interesting because you get to learn to do stuff that you wouldn’t expect. With that too, you get to interact with basically everyone in the office, from the General Manager to the kitchen assistant. If you are open enough, you get to know what makes them wake up early in the morning. You see things in a different perspective and you get to know their ambitions whatever it may be. Those interactions can teach you a lot as a young professional.
  3. it’s which boss you follow” – I have to admit after finishing my MBA, I felt like I knew everything in business. I was that “annoying know-it-all-I’m-too-good-for-you MBA person”. Yeah, I’m sure you know someone like that too and yes, they’re definitely annoying I must say! :D Back to my point, the graduate programme gives you the opportunity to interact with various kinds of bosses in the affiliate and in global. It gives you the opportunity to learn from them and network with them, you also get to have free advice from them on your life goals. They can provide you with good inputs on how to live your life and how to properly grow professionally. These valuable lessons and inputs would have costed thousands of dollars from consultants, but you get to have them for free, or maybe a cup of coffee (which can sometimes still be free too if there’s a coffee machine in the office!)
  4. “A good boss teaches you differently.” – In my first ever meeting with the General Manager of the Philippines back then, he told me, “don’t be afraid to make mistakes.” Throughout my experience in the graduate programme, that phrase has been repeated by all my direct managers. Being a graduate lets you do things that haven’t been done before, it lets you take risks without really worrying too much. If unsuccessful, the worst thing that can happen is that your boss will just ask, “So, what did you learn from it?” Of course, these risks still have to be calculated risks and it should still be within the bounds of the Novo Nordisk Way.
    On another note, I’ve always envisioned myself to be working in the global headquarters right after doing my masters. However, this ambition has changed a lot after the interactions I’ve had during the Market Access and Public Affairs summit.  Vice-Presidents, Directors, senior managers, and various product managers from all over the world were in Copenhagen for a 2-day summit which I was fortunately been invited too. Learning from their experiences and their best practices from their affiliates is probably one of the highlights of my rotation in Denmark. This experience has inspired me even more to work harder in improving patient access to our products.

MAPA summit

 

As a parting shot, I would like to share what my boss in Denmark told me as it’s definitely different from what I have been taught before, “People who walk with the most stars on their shoulders here in HQ are from the affiliates.”

 

Have a good day,

Paul

 

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Time to apply – who are we looking for?

Category: Business Processes European Finance Global & European Market Access Global Finance Global Marketing Global Procurement Product Supply R&D Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control Graduate Programme R&D Global Development R&D Regulatory Affairs | (28) comments

The deadline for applying for one of the graduate programmes is closing in – you have to send in your application here no later than 12 February 2017. I can imagine that many of you who are considering applying for one of the graduate programmes have thoughts about what type of people Novo Nordisk is looking for. So to clarify this, I will briefly go through the formal qualifications needed to apply, but also the profile and characteristics we hope to find and how you can implement this in your application.

Formal qualifications needed to apply:

  • A Master’s degree from 2016 or 2017 in a relevant field (depending on which programme you apply for, but it could be economics, international business, public health, marketing or similar).
  • Above average academic achievements.
  • A minimum of 6 months of relevant work experience or extracurricular activities.
  • International experience from working, studying or volunteering.
  • Professional fluency in English.
  • The right mind-set with a can-do attitude, high ambitions and excellent interpersonal skills.

The graduate profile we are looking for is characterised by being:

  • Driven – You have to know why you want to work for Novo Nordisk and why you want to be part of the graduate programme.
  • A team player – You should be able to work well in teams and have a humble attitude. Great work is not done by one person alone, but in a team, so we expect you to have a team player mind-set.
  • Proactive – You have to be ready to take initiative and show enthusiasm. We need people who are proactive and not sitting around waiting for someone else to do something.
  • Ready for change – You will be put through three different rotations (read more about the rotations in European Market Access here), so we want someone who can adapt and enjoys change.
  • Result oriented – You have to be able to deliver results and be a high achiever. We are looking for talents who knows what they want and who can deliver great results.

A good way of demonstrating that you possess these characteristics is by giving concrete examples! This applies to both your cover letter, but also in interviews. Examples are great because your previous behaviour in job situations is the best indicator of your future behaviour. The examples shouldn’t be too long, so don’t explain all the details. Instead you should emphasize your role, who was involved and what the results were. And most importantly – what did you learn from it? Remember that the best example may not necessarily be one where you achieved the best result, but where you played a major role and your great competencies were expressed clearly. If you are lucky, it might be the same example.

So, use examples in your online application (including the 1-minute video) to show who you are and why Novo Nordisk should hire you for a graduate position. Read other good tips and tricks for the application process here and here. I wish you the best of luck with your application and feel free to leave a comment or a question below!

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The video.

Category: Business Processes European Finance Global & European Market Access Global Finance Global Marketing Global Procurement International Operations Business International Operations Finance Product Supply R&D Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control Graduate Programme R&D Global Development R&D Regulatory Affairs | (0) comments

Creating a video to accompany your traditional CV would be a great way to stand out from the crowd. So, do not fear the video, the video is your friend!

The video was actually my favourite part of the application. It really gives you a chance to put a human touch on your application package and provide more insights into what you can offer. Yes, the video can be challenging. Depending on the person, one minute can seem like either way too little or way too much time. Here are a few tips to nail your video:

Look good, feel good, play good. The quality of the video isn’t tied to just that one minute in front of the camera – it also matters how you prepare. Clean up and rest up so that you feel at your best! Like I said, your video can show things about yourself that can’t be captured on a cover letter and CV!

Don’t repeat yourself. This helps us make sure you’re not a robot. Try not to repeat exactly what can be read from your cover letter and CV for the whole minute. Sure you can refer to a couple of relevant aspects, but make sure to tie them to yourself as a person. For example, I spoke more about my experience moving from Canada to the US and how it sparked my interest in the way the relationship between the public and private sectors impact patient access to treatment (personal), ultimately pushing me to study Public Policy & Global Health (on CV).

The most repetitive advice of the day – be YOU. It really doesn’t get simpler than this. Make sure to reflect on who you are as a person – what makes you a unique fit for Novo Nordisk, specifically – and show it in your video. A sense of authenticity can definitely be captured over a video, so make sure to show that.

These tips should set you well on your way to making a video that George Lucas would be proud of! If you are still on the stage of your cover letter, check out some advice from Albert here.

The deadline is Feb 12th for most programmes, so get applying!

All the best,

Brandon

"Don't make the same mistake that I did, Luke."

“Don’t make the same mistake I did, Luke” said the robot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How could the three rotations in European Market Access look like?

Category: Global & European Market Access | (0) comments

Just like many of the other graduate programmes the European Market Access track has three rotations of 8 months each. During these three different rotations you will experience the many ways Novo Nordisk ensures patients access to our innovative products in Europe. Below I have tried to elaborate on what the three rotations might look like and what type of work you would be exposed to.

The first rotation: The European Regional office in Denmark The European regional office acts as the intermediary between Global Market Access strategy and local implementation in the affiliates around the world. The office has up until recently been located in Zurich, but is now located in Ørestaden, Denmark together with the Danish affiliate and the business area covering ‘Europe North & Central’. In this rotation you will support both headquarter and affiliates optimising activities. Therefore you will get an introduction to working in Market Access that covers both the more strategic work done in headquarter and the more hands-on work done in affiliates. This will provide you with an overview of the many aspects of market access and public affairs!

The second rotation: A European affiliate or business area (BA) This rotation is where you get to go abroad (naturally within Europe) and gain a lot of international experience while building a network! The work done in affiliates and BA’s is more focused on local strategies and the execution and implementation of the strategy. You will work on many and broad aspects of market access engagement and collaboration. Depending on the size of the affiliate, you will experience a market access team who are in charge of everything related to market access and public affairs. In the second rotation you will likely be driving your own project – of course supervised by your host manager – where you are in charge of the work process and outcome. In affiliates you are extremely close to the market (including local payers) and will gain valuable knowledge and experience that you can leverage in your last rotation.

The third rotation: Global Market Access in Denmark (HQ) The last rotation may be in Global Market Access in headquarter based in Bagsværd, Denmark. This department is constantly growing because market access is becoming increasingly important to the success of the company (read my previous blog post about why market access is so important right here). Here you will be part of one the teams within the department, such as Public Affairs, Health Economics & Outcomes Research (HEOR) or Strategic Pricing. In general the work done in Global Market Access is focused on developing strategies within these areas, which means that you can really use and leverage the many invaluable insights you have gained in the two previous rotations.

If you are still not convinced why you should apply I have listed my top five reasons below:

  1. You will have the opportunity to make a difference to patients and society while delivering exciting results from a business perspective
  2. Novo Nordisk is the world leader in diabetes care
  3. The programme is designed to develop top talent become future leaders
  4. You will be challenged – expect a steep learning curve!
  5. During the two-year journey you will build an extraordinary network

Don’t forget that the deadline for applying for one of the graduate programmes is 12 February (this Sunday!), so get started on your application today! I wish you the best of luck and remember to be yourself!

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Is a graduate position a real job?

Category: R&D Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control Graduate Programme | (0) comments

I often get this or similar questions accompanied by confused looking eyes when I tell people about my graduate job at Novo Nordisk. But you already graduated? Aren’t you qualified for a real job, they might ask.
To all of you, to stop all confusion, I can tell you that YES, the graduate positions are real jobs. Real jobs which are paid as every other job, and where you are part of departments on equal terms as full time employees.
As every employee you make an Individual Development Plan with your managers, you set goals for your rotations and you get lots of challenging and highly important tasks and projects on equal terms as permanent employees.
Furthermore it is acknowledged that this is probably your first real job after graduating. You get an experienced mentor to guide you through all your rotations. This is great, because you can discuss future career goals, ask questions that you might not want to ask your manager and first of all you get a buddy within Novo Nordisk from day 1.

More than a full time job
So, since you have the same responsibilities as a permanent employee, you might ask: ‘Why don’t just apply for a permanent position from the beginning, instead of wasting two years shopping around different departments before settling down?
Well, depending on who you are, some reasons will speak more to you than others. I have made a list of all the good reasons why a graduate program is so awesome (and highlighted my own favourite reasons):

  • By working in 3 departments you get a diverse work life with ever changing tasks. As your first job, this is a great way to get a feeling of where you can see yourself working permanently one day.
  • You get a broad understanding of the company and the way the different departments are connected. This will help you get a birds perspective of the company and is a big plus in future jobs.
  • Network – because you get to work in 3 different places and on top of that have a big network of graduates from all over the company you get a bigger network than you can imagine. This is very valuable in the future, and hanging out with the graduates is great fun, I might add :)
  • You get specialist knowledge of 3 areas within Novo Nordisk in only 2 years. This will make you a very attractive candidate in your future career. Graduates are compared to candidates with much longer resumes and experience because they have experience from a broad variety of tasks.
  • Being a graduate at Novo Nordisk you also get special development offers, such as Project management and presentation skill courses, and a steep learning curve within all areas of your professional life is always in focus.

I hope that this post has showed you that a graduate position is for sure a real job – and that it will be a great starting point if you want to pursue an exciting, challenging and life changing career. To apply for positions (deadline 12th of February!) or read more on the different graduate programs, check out the graduate pages here, or this blog on requirments for a great candidate.

Do not hesitate to ask questions,

/Sofie

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What a European market acces graduate actually does…

Category: Global & European Market Access | (4) comments

I remember when I applied for the European Market Access programme last year, I researched (as you may remember from my first blog post) what market access is and what a job within this field would entail. After I did some research, I felt like I had a pretty good idea of the areas market access covers (such as health economics, value communication, public affairs, and so on), but it still felt a little like a black box. I had a lot of questions, including: What could an example be of a task? How does a day look for someone working in market access? I imagine that you have similar questions and considerations, so I will try to address this and hopefully make it a little clearer what a market access position looks like in real life.

I am the only graduate in my year with a first rotation in an affiliate – the other business graduates are currently in headquarter and will have their affiliate experience during their next rotation. I will have two affiliate rotations, as I am going to the affiliate in the U.K. for my next rotation (which is an extremely interesting place to go if you want to learn about European market access!). Working in an affiliate is extremely exciting – here you have the opportunity to learn about practically every aspect market access and thus get a broad understanding of the many different areas. My first rotation is in the Danish affiliate located in Ørestaden, which makes a lot of sense for me, since I studied Public Health at University of Copenhagen and therefore have an understanding of the Danish healthcare system structure and a general overview of the political environment. For me, working in the Danish affiliate has been a great introduction to market access!

I have tried to gather some examples of tasks that I have worked on so far, and to outline a typical day at the office as a European Market Access graduate. My hope is that it will give you a more concrete feeling of what types of tasks you could get in market access and how life as a graduate is in the reality of an affiliate.

Below you will find some examples of tasks I have worked on so far:

  • Prepared and given a presentation for World Diabetes Day
  • Contributed to process of obtaining reimbursement for a new insulin product
  • Organised and prepared a workshop for the Danish management team focusing on obesity treatment in Denmark
  • Helped organise a political conference on the treatment of obesity in the Danish healthcare system

In addition to the affiliate-specific work, I have graduate-related tasks, such as:

  • Writing graduate blog posts
  • Writing a case for a CEMS business project in a Norwegian business school
  • Participate in graduate events and trainings, e.g. about project management, personal development or presentation skills

 

What a day working in market access in the Danish affiliate could look like:

  • 08.30 – I usually come into the office and start my day by checking my calendar & email and making a to-do list for the day.
  • 09.00 – We usually meet briefly in the market access team and update each other on what the plan for the day is, and if needed we discuss how to approach a task or meeting.
  • 10.00 – I often have a meeting or two before lunch, either internally e.g. with a brand team or externally with e.g. an agency.
  • 11.00 – Depending on the number of meetings, I usually have some time to prepare for the next meeting or work on what is on my to-do list.
  • 12.00 – Lunch
  • 12.30 – Back to work! Hopefully sending some emails and crossing some minor tasks off my to-do list, unless something urgent have come up, which in my opinion only makes the workday more exciting!
  • 14.00 – Another meeting/teleconference with either an internal or external stakeholder.
  • 15.30 – A short coffee break with one of my colleagues and then back to the computer, telephone or meeting room.
  • 16.00 – Depending on how the day developed, I usually have some time during the afternoon to discuss my tasks with the market access manager in the team or work on something graduate related if needed.
  • 17.00 – I leave the office around 5, depending on the work load and how much time I have had during the day to make it through my to-do list.

 

I hope this little sneak peek into my affiliate experience have answered some of your questions, if not feel free to reach out to me by leaving a comment below! You can also read Albert’s blog post: Take a look into my calendar – what a week as a graduate looks like for more insight into a headquarter rotation in R&D Business Support as part of the Business Process programme.

And don’t forget to apply for one of the graduate programmes right here from today (20 January 2017) until 12 February 2017! I can highly recommend the European Market Access programme if you want to be part of the team that ensures millions of patients across Europe get the full benefit of life-changing medicines. 

A little to do list for you!

A little to do list for you!

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PhD or graduate programme?

Category: R&D Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control Graduate Programme | (2) comments

Hello everyone

Most of you out there are probably in the same position as I was in last year around this time. You are deciding how you want to start your professional career after finishing university. I studied biochemistry, and there we were directed towards a future in academic research. The ‘right’ thing to do upon finishing your master was to start a PhD. With this background it was hard to imagine what you could do besides academia. Of cause I knew about the industry, but what exactly where the jobs you could get there? How did you get in? And did you limit yourself in your future career if you chose not to do a PhD? Today I will share my own considerations before applying for the CMC Graduate programme.

Career considerations
Upon finishing my studies last December, I knew that I did not want to pursuit a career within academia. I wanted to work in the medical industry, closer to the end product of biomedical research; medicine helping patients every day. Still I was considering whether I should do a PhD or not. I had been told that a PhD was a necessity for almost all research related jobs in the medical industry. That is at least how it is in Denmark. I knew that I wanted to stay within research to a certain degree, so completely abandoning the science and starting to apply for jobs within e.g. quality assurance was not really an option.

I considered if an industrial PhD could be a possibility. I soon realised that the process of establishing a PhD project, finding collaborators in the industry and applying for funding is long – and that you almost certainly need connections within the industry. If you can get your foot in when you are still studying, for example by applying for a Novo Nordisk internship or collaborating with a company during your master project, you will have good cards on your hand. If you are still studying and have these opportunities, I highly recommend these options, connections to the industry and getting a hang of what actually is going on out there is never a bad thing :)

Making lists
At this point in my career considerations the CMC Development Graduate programme suddenly became available. It was a brand new programme, and from first sight it caught my interest. I had previously had a mentor from Global Research at Novo Nordisk, and he had explained the structure of Novo Nordisk to me. Immediately, I knew that CMC Development would be the place for me. If you are curious on what CMC Development is, read my old posts here. In order to make sure that this programme would give me as many opportunities as a PhD, I asked my professor, a connection within Novo Nordisk CMC Development and a current Regulatory Affairs Graduate for advice (if you are interested in the RA graduate programme, read more on Mathilde’s awesome blog here). They all agreed that the graduate programme would be the right choice if I wanted to make a career within Novo Nordisk or anywhere else in the industry. It would, on the other hand, maybe close the door to the academic world. After discussing whit them I came up with a list of competencies/career catalysts you gain from a PhD/graduate programme:

  • PhD: Specialist, contemplation in a scientific subject, understanding of the academic world, PhD diploma, collaboration, (maybe) international outlook, responsibility for your own project
  • Graduate: Generalist in broad area (CMC), collaborations, team-work, international perspective, understanding of the industrial business and mind-set, broad professional network, quick adaptation, constantly new challenges and projects

You can probably add more labels to the lists, and also make ‘negative’ lists, but seeing it spelled out black on white, there was no doubt in my mind. I applied for the Graduate programme and I haven’t regretted my decision ever since. Especially the team-work, rotations and international outlook attracted me, compared to a PhD, where you mainly work independently on one project.

My advice to you is to make similar lists between your choices, or maybe continue my lists, if your choice is between a PhD and a Novo Nordisk Graduate programme. Ask around to figure out what opportunities and limitations the different options give you – and if you have questions regarding the graduate programme, feel free to reach out to me and start browsing the Graduate homepage. And remember, if you want to apply for one of the programmes hiring in 2017, the application opens on Friday the 20th of January.

After my research I know that if you want to pursuit a career within the medical industry, having completed a Novo Nordisk graduate program will always be a plus :)

/Sofie

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About the International Operations Finance Graduate Program

Category: International Operations Business International Operations Finance | (0) comments

Hello!

I am Binh and I come from Vietnam. I became a graduate in Novo Nordisk International Operations (AAMEO) Finance Graduate Program in September 2016. This is my first graduate blog post. Nice to meet you!

As you are reading this, you probably are interested in Novo Nordisk and the promise of a challenging and rewarding two-year adventure called Novo Nordisk’s Graduate Programme. Does that sound intriguing to you? Let read on and find out what you can expect when joining the International Operations (AAMEO) Finance Graduate Programme.

  • What is in the name?
  • The AAMEO Finance Graduate Programme is your opportunity to engage in Novo Nordisk’s finance organization that covers Africa, Asia, Middle East & Oceania. AMMEO region includes 110 countries with many emerging and developing markets, which promises a diverse and challenging environment for all ambitious prospective finance graduates out there!

    Now, if you are interested, let imagine yourself in the shoes of a graduate and see what is ahead of you:

  • What is in the program?
    • Your Rotations:

    As an AAMEO Finance Graduate, you will work in three different countries in 2 years – 8 months for each rotation. You spend one rotation in your home country office and two others in one of the business area headquarters, the region AAMEO headquarters in Dubai, UAE, or the corporate headquarters in Denmark.

    As a result, you have opportunities to get exposed to different cultures and working styles, collaborate with multi-cultural colleagues, learn from diverse perspectives and gain a more global understanding of the industry in general and the finance operations in particular.

    • Your Tasks:

    As a graduate, you will take on a variety of tasks to enhance different key finance competencies. More specifically, you can develop skills in finance planning and analysis, finance control and reporting, as well as project management. When you relocate outside your home office, you can have the opportunity to explore the specialist areas including but not limited to corporate tax, corporate accounting, treasury, or internal audit.

    As a result, you are able to develop a diverse technical skillset, pursue different finance interests and challenge yourself in different finance areas.

    • Your Graduate Network:

    The AAMEO Finance Graduate programme itself can be seen as a close-knit family of graduates. Even though you may not work directly with other AAMEO finance graduates in the same location, you have opportunities to engage in scheduled Graduate department meetings and Experience sharing sessions, share and listen to stories and challenges of fellow graduates who are located across different continents and time zones. In addition, through the finance graduate training, you can also get connected to the very nice folks who are part of the Global Finance graduate programme and European Finance graduate programme. This graduate network is an exclusive perk of the graduate programme and presents a very nice addition to the international network of colleagues that you build yourself through work in each of your rotation.

    That is all for now! I will be back soon with another post. In the meantime, visit this page to find out more about the programme and our recruiting locations this year, and if you have any questions or comments, don’t hesitate to reach out!

    Binh

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